FAQ for Respondents (Accused Students)

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The information provided on this page is intended to assist students who have been accused of violating the Student Code. We make every effort to update the information in a timely manner, but please be aware that, in any conflict between this information and the Student Disciplinary Procedures, the procedures will prevail.

Please note that the answers provided may not apply if you have been accused of violating the university’s Sexual Misconduct Policy. For frequently asked questions regarding sexual misconduct cases, please see wecare.illinois.edu/faq/discipline/).

In this meeting, your disciplinary officer will explain the student discipline process, discuss any relevant sections of the Student Code, and give you an opportunity to respond to the allegations against you. The disciplinary officer may give you a decision at the conclusion of this meeting, continue the investigation by collecting additional information, or inform you that your case will be decided by the appropriate Subcommittee on Student Conduct.

Yes. If you do not schedule a meeting or miss a meeting that you have scheduled, we may implement a registration hold, or your disciplinary officer may make a decision in your absence.

Most meetings with your disciplinary officer last 15-30 minutes, but some conversation can last an hour or more.

Yes. You may bring a person of your choosing to the meeting to serve as your advisor, though the role of this individual will be very limited. Your advisor may not answer for you or serve as a witness in the investigation.

Yes. Please refer to the frequently asked questions for appellants.

We will place a registration hold on your student account until you submit complete your required sanction and that sanction is approved. This hold will prevent you from changing your schedule, registering for new classes, and graduating.

The jurisdiction of the Student Code is based on an individual's relationship with the university rather than the geographic location of the offense.

The Subcommittee on Undergraduate Student Conduct (SUSC) is a hearing body which derives its power from the Senate Committee on Student Discipline (SCSD). The SUSC is a panel of university faculty and students and is responsible for adjudicating cases involving undergraduates, specifically those who are facing either suspension or dismissal from the university. The SUSC also hears some appeals of disciplinary officer decisions.

In most instances, your disciplinary officer will inform you if your case is being forwarded to the Subcommittee on Undergraduate Student Conduct for a formal hearing. In all cases, the Office for Student Conflict Resolution will email you a hearing notice at least five business days in advance of your hearing.

Most Subcommittee on Undergraduate Student Conduct (SUSC) hearings for scheduled between 1 and 5 p.m. on Friday afternoons. Your hearing notice will specify the date, time, and location of your hearing.

Prior to the hearing, you may view the materials that will be shared with the committee by appointment. In addition, you may meet with your disciplinary officer to discuss the hearing materials and procedures. You may also submit additional documentation and a list of witnesses (along with a statement regarding the nature of their testimony), but we must receive these items at least three business days before your hearing. And the Chair of the committee will decide whether this documentation will be shared with the committee members and/or whether your witnesses will be allowed to participate.

At the hearing itself, you will have the opportunity to present a brief narrative of the incident in question, to answer questions, to suggest questions for any participating witnesses, and to make a closing statement regarding the facts of the case. If you are found in violation of the Student Code, you will also have the opportunity to address the committee one last time before they decide the appropriate sanctions.

Subcommittee on Undergraduate Student Conduct hearings are not open to the public. Only authorized individuals may attend.

Yes. Your advisor may not speak for you, answer questions, ask questions, or directly participate in any way. If your advisor fails to abide by these instructions or is otherwise disruptive, the Chair of the committee may ask them to leave.

One of your parents may serve as your advisor. Only the Chair of the committee may allow both of your parents to attend.

You may submit a list of witnesses (along with a statement regarding the nature of their testimony) to the Office for Student Conflict Resolution at least three business days before your hearing. However, the Chair of the committee will decide whether your witnesses will be allowed to participate.

Although you should feel free to submit character statements, we do not allow character witnesses to participate in a formal hearing.

You are strongly encouraged to attend your hearing, but you are not required to do so. If you do not attend, the committee will decide the case in your absence, and you will be notified of their decision by email.

Yes. Please refer to the frequently asked questions for appellants.

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